Jonathan Grudin

Microsoft Research

Jonathan Grudin

Microsoft Research

Biography

Jonathan Grudin is a principal researcher at Microsoft. He was previously professor of Information and Computer Science at the University of California, Irvine. He received his PhD in cognitive psychology at UC San Diego, working with Donald Norman. Before and after graduate studies he worked as a software developer. He has worked for the British Medical Research Council, Aarhus University, Keio University, and the University of Oslo, and has an affiliate position at the University of Washington Information School. He has been active in the ACM Computer-Human Interaction and Computer-Supported Cooperative Work areas since their formation in the 1980s. His central research foci have been the adoption of communication and collaboration technologies, particularly in enterprise settings, and methods and processes for developing interactive software. In 2014, a paper he gave at CSCW 1988 paper received the first CSCW Lasting Impact award. In recent years he has focused particularly on enterprise uses of social media and on uses of technology in primary and secondary education. For six years he edited ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction and for ten years was an ACM Computing Surveys associate editor. He edited and wrote an ACM Interactions column on HCI history topics for 8 years and has a monthly blog in the online magazine. He is an ACM Technical Fellow and member of the ACM SIGCHI CHI Academy.

Keynote Title: Three Projects and a Projection

Thirty years ago, working as a software engineer, I was asked to help develop information systems for connecting people—a range of communication and collaboration support applications and features. It proved difficult to develop systems that people wanted to use. To understand why I gravitated to research, continuing to work with developers and HCI practitioners when opportunities arise. In this talk I will discuss three favorite projects in recent years that had directly applied goals. The goals were fully realized in one case, partly realized in a second, and the third is a favorite because of what we learned. The project areas were an enterprise email system extension, an enterprise ‘serious game’ platform, and K-12 (primary and secondary) education. I will then step back to describe changes over thirty years that seem salient, and some of the challenges and opportunities confronting us today.